Drug Rehab Therapy

Benzodiazepines Recovery

Benzodiazepines, also known as benzos, are a type of prescription sedative prescribed for anxiety, insomnia, and sometimes prevent epileptic seizures. Benzos are also improperly prescribed for chronic use, despite the high risk of addiction. Benzodiazepines depress the body’s central nervous system which produces a drowsy and calming effect. Common benzos include diazepam (Valium), clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), and alprazolam (Xanax). Benzodiazepines should be used as directed for people who suffer from an anxiety disorder and should not be combined with opioids. When stopping benzos, never should one do it cold turkey. It can produce severe and even life-threatening withdrawal symptoms. Benzo users can struggle to stop completely and may take weeks or months of tapering off their doses.

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Opiate Addiction Recovery

Prescription painkillers are commonly known as opiates, which are derived from opium which comes from poppy plants. Some of the most common are Codeine, Hyrdrocodone, Morphine, Oxycodone, Hydromorphone, and Fentanyl. Opioids are usually prescribed and used for treating pain and once a person develops the tolerance, they begin to want and need more to get the same effect. This is when a person can develop an addiction to opioids. Prescription opioids can lead to unpleasing symptoms and pose additional challenges due to the difficult symptoms of withdrawal that can arise in the first few days of treatment such as low energy, anxiety, hot and cold sweats, cramping, muscle aches and pains, and a runny nose.

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Meth Addiction Recovery

Methamphetamine, also known as meth, is a powerful and addictive stimulant that has reached epidemic proportions across the United States. Some other slang names that are associated with meth are “ice”, “crystal”, “glass”, “Tina”, and “crank”. Meth is usually sold in crystals and or white powder but on occasion, it is sold in pill form as well. Meth can be swallowed, snorted, injected, or smoked. When smoked or injected, a person experiences an immediate and intense euphoric rush that can last for several minutes. When it is taken in other ways, the high comes on more gradually and can last for up to 12 hours.
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Marijuana Use Disorder Recovery

Marijuana is a tricky one for a lot of people these days considering the legalization in some states and laws being decriminalized. However, one can develop a marijuana use disorder which takes the form of addiction in severe cases. Marijuana use disorders also known as dependence is when a person feels withdrawal symptoms when not taking the drug. Some symptoms include cravings, sleep difficulties, mood swings, irritability, and various forms of physical discomfort.
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